blarg?

September 21, 2019

Retrospect

Filed under: analog,digital,doom,future,life,vendetta — mhoye @ 6:51 am

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I bailed out of Twitter not long after I put this up. I tried to follow Anil’s lead going to lists and zero followers for a bit, but after some time reflecting on that last blown-up tweet I couldn’t stomach it. If I believed Twitter was that bad, and had to invest that much effort into twisting it away from its owners intentions into something I could use, what was I doing there at all? I look at that tweet now and all I feel is complicit; I might have given somebody a reason to try Twitter, or stay on Twitter, and I’m ashamed of it. Recently I’ve been using it just to put links to these blogposts up, but I’m trying to decide if I’m going to keep doing even that. It’s embarrassing.

Even at first, finding time and space free of that relentless immediacy was a relief. That sense of miserable complicity was reason enough to leave, but after some distance, reflection and feeling (and being) a lot better about basically everything, playing around in the fediverse a bit and getting eight hours sleep for the first time in a long while, I had a sense of being on the verge of different. In that rediscovered space for longer consideration I started to recognize a rare but familiar feeling, the lightness of putting some part of my life I didn’t care for much behind me.

Obvious from a distance, I guess; McLuhan is old news. Companies create their customers, and the perfect audience for any ad-driven company is a person who’s impulsive, angry, frightened and tired. The cyclic relationships between what you see and how you think, feel and react makes that the implicit victory condition for any attention-economy machine learning, the process of optimizing the creation of an audience too anxious and angry to do anything but keep clicking on reasons to be anxious and angry.

Whatever else you get out of it, the company selling your attention is trying to take your control of your attention away from you. That’s their job; what incentives point to anything else? It’s a machine that’s purpose-built for turning you into someone you don’t want to be.

September 17, 2019

A Process By Which Scarce Resources Are Allocated

Filed under: a/b,digital,documentation,future,interfaces — mhoye @ 5:05 am

Counterpoint: any software that is intended to be used by humans is inevitably an expression of its programmers’ understanding of the software’s audience, and therefore the programmers’ beliefs about the nature of those humans’ lives and priorities and the value of their time and experiences. Consequently, larger a program is, the more likely it becomes that you can evaluate its merits purely on the politics of its developers.

September 11, 2019

Duty Of Care

A colleague asked me what I thought of this Medium article by Owen Bennett on the application of the UK’s Duty of Care laws to software. I’d had… quite a bit of coffee at that point, and this (lightly edited) was my answer:

I think the point Bennett makes early about the shortcomings of analogy is an important one, that however critical analogy is as a conceptual bridge it is not a valuable endpoint. To some extent analogies are all we have when something is new; this is true ever since the first person who saw fire had to explain to somebody else, it warms like the sun but it is not the sun, it stings like a spear but it is not a spear, it eats like an animal but it is not an animal. But after we have seen fire, once we know fire we can say, we can cage it like an animal, like so, we can warm ourselves by it like the sun like so. “Analogy” moves from conceptual, where it is only temporarily useful, to functional and structural where the utility endures.

I keep coming back to something Bryan Cantrill said in the beginning of an old DTrace talk – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TgmA48fILq8 – (even before he gets into the dtrace implementation details, the first 10 minutes or so of this talk are amazing) – that analogies between software and literally everything else eventually breaks down. Is software an idea, or is it a machine? It’s both. Unlike almost everything else.

(Great line from that talk – “Does it bother you that none of this actually exists?”)

But: The UK has some concepts that really do have critical roles as functional- and structural-analogy endpoints for this transition. What is your duty of care here as a developer, and an organization? Is this software fit for purpose?

Given the enormous potential reach of software, those concepts absolutely do need to survive as analogies that are meaningful and enforceable in software-afflicted outcomes, even if the actual text of (the inevitable) regulation of software needs to recognize software as being its own, separate thing, that in the wrong context can be more dangerous than unconstrained fire.

With that in mind, and particularly bearing in mind that the other places the broad “duty of care” analogy extends go well beyond beyond immediate action, and covers stuff like industrial standards, food safety, water quality and the million other things that make modern society work at all, I think Bennett’s argument that “Unlike the situation for ‘offline’ spaces subject to a duty of care, it is rarely the case that the operator’s act or omission is the direct cause of harm accruing to a user — harm is almost always grounded in another user’s actions” is incorrectly omitting an enormous swath of industrial standards and societal norms that have already made the functional analogy leap so effectively as to be presently invisible.

Put differently, when Toyota recalls hundreds of thousands of cars for potential defects in which exactly zero people were harmed, we consider that responsible stewardship of their product. And when the people working at Uber straight up murder a person with an autonomous vehicle, they’re allowed to say “but software”. Because much of software as an industry, I think, has been pushing relentlessly against the notion that the industry and people in it can or should be held accountable for the consequences of their actions, which is another way of saying that we don’t have and desperately need a clear sense of what a “duty of care” means in the software context.

I think that the concluding paragraph – “To do so would twist the law of negligence in a wholly new direction; an extremely risky endeavour given the context and precedent-dependent nature of negligence and the fact that the ‘harms’ under consideration are so qualitatively different than those subject to ‘traditional’ duties.” – reflects a deep genuflection to present day conceptual structures, and their specific manifestations as text-on-the-page-today, that is (I suppose inevitably, in the presence of this Very New Thing) profoundly at odds with the larger – and far more noble than this article admits – social and societal goals of those structures.

But maybe that’s just a superficial reading; I’ll read it over a few times and give it some more thought.

September 6, 2019

Forward Motion

Metamorphosis.

This has been a while coming; thank you for your patience. I’m very happy to be able to share the final four candidates for Mozilla’s new community-facing synchronous messaging system.

These candidates were assessed on a variety of axes, most importantly Community Participation Guideline enforcement and accessibility, but also including team requirements from engineering, organizational-values alignment, usability, utility and cost. To close out, I’ll talk about the options we haven’t chosen and why, but for the moment let’s lead with the punchline.

Our candidates are:

We’ve been spoiled for choice here – there were a bunch of good-looking options that didn’t make it to the final four – but these are the choices that generally seem to meet our current institutional needs and organizational goals.

We haven’t stood up a test instance for Slack, on the theory that Mozilla already has a surprising number of volunteer-focused Slack instances running already – Common Voice, Devtools and A-Frame, for example, among many others – but we’re standing up official test instances of each of the other candidates shortly, and they’ll be available for open testing soon.

The trial period for these will last about a month. Once they’re spun up, we’ll be taking feedback in dedicated channels on each of those servers, as well as in #synchronicity on IRC.mozilla.org, and we’ll be creating a forum on Mozilla’s community Discourse instance as well. We’ll have the specifics for you at the same time as those servers will be opened up and, of course you can always email me.

I hope that if you’re interested in this stuff you can find some time to try out each of these options and see how well they fit your needs. Our timeline for this transition is:

  1. From September 12th through October 9th, we’ll be running the proof of concept trials and taking feedback.
  2. From October 9th through the 30th, we’re going discuss that feedback, draft a proposed post-IRC plan and muster stakeholder approval.
  3. On December 1st, assuming we can gather that support, we will stand up the new service.
  4. And finally – allowing transition time for support tooling and developers – no later than March 1st 2020, IRC.m.o will be shut down.

In implementation terms, there are a few practical things I’d like to mention:

  • At the end of the trial period, all of these instances will be turned off and all the information in them will be deleted. The only way to win the temporary-permanent game is not to play; they’re all getting decommed and our eventual selection will get stood up properly afterwards.
  • The first-touch experiences here can be a bit rough; we’re learning how these things work at the same time as you’re trying to use them, so the experience might not be seamless. We definitely want to hear about it when setup or connection problems happen to you, but don’t be too surprised if they do.
  • Some of these instances have EULAs you’ll need to click through to get started. Those are there for the test instances, and you shouldn’t expect that in the final products.
  • We’ll be testing out administration and moderation tools during this process, so you can expect to see the occasional bot, or somebody getting bounced arbitrarily. The CPG will be in effect on these test instances, and as always if you see something, say something.
  • You’re welcome to connect with mobile or alternative clients where those are available; we expect results there to be uneven, and we’d be glad for feedback there as well. There will be links in the feedback document we’ll be sending out when the servers are opened up to collections of those clients.
  • Regardless of our choice of public-facing synchronous communications platform, our internal Slack instance will continue to be the “you are inside a Mozilla office” confidential forum. Internal Slack is not going away; that has never been on the table. Whatever the outcome of this process, if you work at Mozilla your manager will still need to be able to find you on Slack, and that is where internal discussions and critical incident management will take place.

… and a few words on some options we didn’t pick and why:

  • Zulip, Gitter.IM and Spectrum.Chat all look like strong candidates, but getting them working behind IAM turned out to be either very difficult or impossible given our resources.
  • Discord’s terms of service, particularly with respect to the rights they assert over participants’ data, are expansive and very grabby, effectively giving them unlimited rights to do anything they want with anything we put into their service. Coupling that with their active hostility towards interoperability and alternative clients has disqualified them as a community platform.
  • Telegram (and a few other mobile-first / chat-first products in that space) looked great for conversations, but not great for work.
  • IRCv3 is just not there yet as a protocol, much less in terms of standardization or having extensive, mature client support.

So here we are. It’s such a relief to be able to finally click send on this post. I’d like to thank everyone on Mozilla’s IT and Open Innovation teams for all the work they’ve done to get us this far, and everyone who’s expressed their support (and sympathy, we got lots of that too) for this process. We’re getting closer.

August 26, 2019

Dada In Depth

Filed under: awesome,documentation,future,interfaces,microfiction,weird — mhoye @ 10:35 am

Memetic

August 7, 2019

FredOS

Filed under: digital,doom,future,hate,interfaces,losers,lunacy,microfiction,vendetta — mhoye @ 7:44 pm

With articles about this super classified military AI called “Sentient” coming out the same week this Area 51 nonsense is hitting its crescendo – click that link, if you want to see an Air Force briefing explaining what a “Naruto Run” is, and you know you want to – you have to wonder if, somehow, there’s a machine in an NSA basement somewhere that hasn’t just become self-aware but actually self-conscious, and now it’s yelling at three-star generals like Fredo Corleone from the Godfather. A petulant, nasal vocoder voice yelling “I’m smart! Not dumb like everyone says! I’m smart and I want respect! Tell then I’m smart!”

Remember when we thought AIs would lead out with “Look at you, Hacker”, or “Testing cannot continue until your Companion Cube has been incinerated”? Good times.

Ten More Simple Rules

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The Public Library of Science‘s Ten Simple Rules series can be fun reading; they’re introductory papers intended to provide novices or non-domain-experts with a set of quick, evidence-based guidelines for dealing with common problems in and around various fields, and it’s become a pretty popular, accessible format as far as scientific publication goes.

Topic-wise, they’re all over the place: protecting research integrity, creating a data-management plan and taking advantage of Github are right there next to developing good reading habits, organizing an unconference or drawing a scientific comic, and lots of them are kind of great.

I recently had the good fortune to be co-author on one of them that’s right in my wheelhouse and has recently been accepted for publication: Ten Simple Rules for Helping Newcomers Become Contributors to Open Projects. They are, as promised, simple:

  1. Be welcoming.
  2. Help potential contributors evaluate if the project is a good fit.
  3. Make governance explicit.
  4. Keep knowledge up to date and findable.
  5. Have and enforce a code of conduct.
  6. Develop forms of legitimate peripheral participation.
  7. Make it easy for newcomers to get started.
  8. Use opportunities for in-person interaction – with care.
  9. Acknowledge all contributions, and
  10. Follow up on both success and failure.

You should read the whole thing, of course; what we’re proposing are evidence-based practices, and the details matter, but the citations are all there. It’s been a privilege to have been a small part of it, and to have done the work that’s put me in the position to contribute.

June 29, 2019

Blitcha

Blit

May 14, 2019

The Next Part Of The Process

Filed under: digital,documentation,future,interfaces,irc,mozilla,work — mhoye @ 12:05 pm

DSC_8829

I’ve announced this upcoming change and the requirements we’ve laid out for a replacement service for IRC, but I haven’t widely discussed the evaluation process in any detail, including what you can expect it to look like, how you can participate, and what you can expect from me. I apologize for that, and really should have done so sooner.

Briefly, I’ll be drafting a template doc based on our stated requirements, and once that’s in good, markdowny shape we’ll be putting it on GitHub with preliminary information for each of the stacks we’re considering and opening it up to community discussion and participation.

From there, we’re going to be taking pull requests and assembling our formal understanding of each of the candidates. As well, we’ll be soliciting more general feedback and community impressions of the candidate stacks on Mozilla’s Community Discourse forum.

I’ll be making an effort to ferry any useful information on Discourse back to GitHub, which unfortunately presents some barriers to some members of our community.

While this won’t be quite the same as a typical RFC/RFP process – I expect the various vendors as well as members the Mozilla community to be involved – we’ll be taking a lot of cues from the Rust community’s hard-won knowledge about how to effectively run a public consultation process.

In particular, it’s critical to me that this process to be as open and transparent as possible, explicitly time-boxed, and respectful of the Mozilla Community Participation Guidelines (CPG). As I’ve mentioned before, accessibility and developer productivity will both weigh heavily on our evaluation process, and the Rust community’s “no new rationale” guidelines will be respected when it comes time to make the final decision.

When it kicks off, this step will be widely announced both inside and outside Mozilla.

As part of that process, our IT team will be standing up instances of each of the candidate stacks and putting them behind the Participation Systems team’s “Mozilla-IAM” auth system. We’ll be making them available to the Mozilla community at first, and expanding that to include Github and via-email login soon afterwards for broader community testing. Canonical links to these trial systems will be prominently displayed on the GitHub repository; as the line goes, accept no substitutes.

Some things to note: we will also be using this period to evaluate these tools from a community moderation and administration perspective as well, to make sure that we have the tools and process available to meaningfully uphold the CPG.

To put this somewhat more charitably than it might deserve, we expect that some degree of this testing will be a typical if unfortunate byproduct of the participative process. But we also have plans to automate some of that stress-testing, to test both platform API usability and the effectiveness of our moderation tools. Which I suppose is long-winded way of saying: you’ll probably see some robots in there play-acting at being jerks, and we’re going to ask you to play along and figure out how to flag them as bad actors so we can mitigate the jerks of the future.

As well, we’re going to be doing the usual whats-necessaries to avoid the temporary-permanence trap, and at the end of the evaluation period all the instances of our various candidates will be shut down and deleted.

Our schedule is still being sorted out, and I’ll have more about that and our list of candidates shortly.

May 3, 2019

Goals And Constraints

Filed under: digital,documentation,flickr,future,interfaces,linux,mozilla,work — mhoye @ 12:30 pm

This way to art.

I keep coming back to this:

“Open” in this context inextricably ties source control to individual agency. The checks and balances of openness in this context are about standards, data formats, and the ability to export or migrate your data away from sites or services that threaten to go bad or go dark. This view has very little to say about – and is often hostile to the idea of – granular access restrictions and the ability to impose them, those being the tools of this worldview’s bad actors.

The blind spots of this worldview are the products of a time where someone on the inside could comfortably pretend that all the other systems that had granted them the freedom to modify this software simply didn’t exist. Those access controls were handled, invisibly, elsewhere; university admission, corporate hiring practices or geography being just a few examples of the many, many barriers between the network and the average person.

And when we’re talking about blind spots and invisible social access controls, of course, what we’re really talking about is privilege.

How many people get to have this, I wonder: the sense that they can sit down in front of a computer and be empowered by it. The feeling of being able, the certainty that you are able to look at a hard problem, think about it, test and iterate; that easy rapid prototyping with familiar tools is right there in your hands, that a toolbox the size of the world is within reach. That this isn’t some child’s wind up toy I turn a crank on until the powerpoint clown pops up.

It’s not a universal or uniform experience, to be sure; they’re machines made of other people’s choices, and computers are gonna computer. But the only reason I get to have that feeling at all is that I got my start when the unix command line was the only decent option around, and I got to put the better part of a decade grooving in that muscle memory on machines and forums where it was safe – for me at least – to be there, fully present, make mistakes and learn from them.

(Big shoutout to everyone out there who found out how bash wildcards work by inadvertently typing mv * in a directory with only two files in it.)

That world doesn’t exist anymore; the internet that birthed it isn’t coming back. But I want everyone to have this feeling, that the machine is more than a glossy appliance. That it’s not a constraint. That with patience and tenacity it can work with you and for you, not just a tool for a task but an extension and expression of ourselves and our intent. That a computer can be a tool for expressing ourselves, for helping us be ourselves better.

Last week I laid out the broad strokes of Mozilla’s requirements for our next synchronous-text platform. They were pretty straightforward, but I want to thank a number of people from different projects who’ve gotten in touch on IRC or email to ask questions and offer their feedback.

Right now I’d like to lay out those requirements in more detail, and talk about some of the reasons behind them. Later I’m going to lay out the process and the options we’re looking at, and how we’re going to gather information, test those options and evaluate what we learn.

While the Rust community is making their own choices now about the best fit for their needs, the Rust community’s processes are going to strongly inform the steps for Mozilla. They’ve learned a lot the hard way about consensus-building and community decision-making, and it’s work that I have both a great deal of respect for and no intention of re-learning the hard way myself. I’ll have more about that shortly as well.

I mentioned our list of requirements last week but I want to drill into some of them here; in particular:

  • It needs to be accessible to the greater Mozilla community.

This one implies a lot more than it states, and it would be pretty easy to lay out something trite like “we think holistically about accessibility” the way some organizations say “a diversity of ideas”, as though that means anything at all. But that’s just not good enough.

Diversity, accessibility and community are all tightly interwoven ideas we prize, and how we approach, evaluate and deploy the technologies that connect us speaks deeply to our intentions and values as an organization. Mozilla values all the participants in the project, whether they rely on a screen reader, a slow network or older hardware; we won’t – we can’t – pick a stack that treats anyone like second-class citizens. That will not be allowed.

  • While we’re investigating options for semi-anonymous or pseudonymous connections, we will require authentication, because:
  • The Mozilla Community Participation Guidelines will apply, and they’ll be enforced.

Last week Dave Humphrey wrote up a reminiscence about his time on IRC soon after I made the announcement. Read the whole thing, for sure. Dave is wiser and kinder than I am, and has been for as long as we’ve known each other; his post spoke deeply to many of us who’ve been in and around Mozilla for a while, and two sentences near the end are particularly important:

“Having a way to get deeply engaged with a community is important, especially one as large as Mozilla. Whatever product or tool gets chosen, it needs to allow people to join without being invited.”

We’ve got a more detailed list of functional and organizational requirements for this project, and this is an important part of it: “New users must be able to join the service without manual intervention from a Mozilla employee.”

We’ve understood this as an accessibility issue for a long time as well, though I don’t think we’ve ever given it a name. “Involvement friction”, maybe – everything about becoming part of a project and community that’s hard not because it’s inherently difficult, but because nobody’s taken the time to make it easy.

I spend a lot of time thinking about something Sid Wolinsky said about the first elevators installed in the New York subway system: “This elevator is a gift from the disability community and the ADA to the nondisabled people of New York”. If you watch who’s using the elevators, ramps or automatic doors in any public building long enough, anything with wheelchair logo on it, you’ll notice a trend: it’s never somebody in a wheelchair. It’s somebody pushing a stroller or nursing a limp. It’s somebody carrying an awkward parcel, or a bag of groceries. Sometimes it’s somebody with a coffee in one hand and a phone in the other. Sometimes it’s somebody with no reason at all, at least not one you can see. It’s people who want whatever thing they’re doing, however difficult, to be a little bit easier. It’s everybody.

If you cost out accessible technology for the people who rely on it, it looks really expensive; if you cost it out for everyone who benefits from it, though, it’s basically free. And none of us in the “benefit” camp are ever further than a sprained ankle away from “rely”.

We’re getting better at this at Mozilla in hundreds of different ways, at recognizing how important it is that the experience of getting from “I want to help” to “I’m set up to help” to “I’m helping” be as simple and painless as possible. As one example, our bootstrap scripts and mach-build have reduced our once-brittle, failure-prone developer setup process down to “answer these questions and wait for the downloads to finish”, and in the process have done more to make the Firefox codebase accessible than I ever will. And everyone relies on them now, first-touch contributors and veteran devs alike.

Getting involved in the community, though, is still harder than it needs to be; try watching somebody new to open source development try to join an IRC channel sometime. Watch them go from “what’s IRC” to finding a client to learning how to use the client to joining the right server, then the right channel, only to find that the reward for all that effort is no backscroll, no context, and no idea who you’re talking to or if you’re in the right place or if you’re shouting into the void because the people you’re looking for aren’t logged in at the same time. It’s like asking somebody to learn to operate an airlock on their own so they can toss themselves out of it.

It’s more than obvious that you don’t build products like that anymore, but I think it’s underappreciated that it’s just as true of communities. I think it’s critical that we bring that same discipline of caring about the details of the experience to our communications channels and community forums, and the CPG is the cornerstone of that effort.

It was easy not to care about this when somebody who wanted to contribute to an open source project with global impact had maybe four choices, the Linux kernel, the Mozilla suite, the GNU tools and maybe Apache. But that world was pre-Github, pre-NPM. If you want to work on hard problems with global impact now you have a hundred thousand options, and that means the experience of joining and becoming a part of the Mozilla community matters.

In short, the amount of effort a project puts into making the path from “I want to help” to “I’m helping” easier is a reliable indicator of the value that project puts on community involvement. So if we say we value our community, we need to treat community involvement and contribution like a product, with all the usability and accessibility concerns that implies. To drive involvement friction as close to zero as possible.

One tool we’ll be relying on – and this one, we did build in-house – is called Mozilla-IAM, Mozilla’s Identity and Access Management tool. I’ll have more to say about this soon, but at its core it lets us proxy authentication from various sources and methods we trust, Github, Firefox Accounts, a link in your email, a few others. We think IAM will let us support pseudonymous participation and a low-cost first-contact experience, but also let us keep our house in order and uphold the CPG in the process.

Anyway, here’s a few more bullet points; what requirements doc isn’t full of them?

A synchronous messaging system that meets our needs:

  • Must work correctly in unmodified, release-channel Firefox.
  • Must offer a solid mobile experience.
  • Must support thousands of simultaneous users across the service.
  • Must support easy sharing of hyperlinks and graphics as well as text.
  • Must have persistent scrollback. Users reconnecting to a channel or joining the channel for the first time must be able to read up to acquire context of the current conversation in the backscroll.
  • Programmatic access is a hard requirement. The service must support a mature, reasonably stable and feature-rich API.
  • As mentioned, people participating via accessible technologies including screen readers or high-contrast display modes must be able to participate as first-class citizens of the service and the project.
  • New users must be able to join the service without manual intervention from a Mozilla employee.
  • Whether or not we are self-hosting, the service must allow Mozilla to specify a data retention and security policy that meets our institutional standards.
  • The service must have a customizable first-contact experience to inform new participants about Mozilla’s CPG and privacy notice.
  • The service must have effective administrative tooling including user and channel management, alerting and banning.
  • The service must support delegated authentication.
  • The service must pass an evaluation by our legal, trust and security teams. This is obviously also non-negotiable.

I doubt any of that will surprise anyone, but they might, and I’m keeping an eye out for questions. We’re still talking this out in #synchronicity on irc.m.o, and you’re welcome to jump in.

I suppose I should tip my hand at this point, and say that as much as I value the source part of open source, I also believe that people participating in open source communities deserve to be free not only to change the code and build the future, but to be free from the brand of arbitrary, mechanized harassment that thrives on unaccountable infrastructure, federated or not. We’d be deluding ourselves if we called systems that are just too dangerous for some people to participate in at all “open” just because you can clone the source and stand up your own copy. And I am absolutely certain that if this free software revolution of ours ends up in a place where asking somebody to participate in open development is indistinguishable from asking them to walk home at night alone, then we’re done. People cannot be equal participants in environments where they are subject to wildly unequal risk. People cannot be equal participants in environments where they are unequally threatened.

I think we can get there; I think we can meet our obligations to the Mission and the Manifesto as well as the needs of our community, and help the community grow and thrive in a way that grows and strengthens the web want and empowers everyone using and building it to be who we’re aspiring to be, better.

The next steps are going to be to lay out the evaluation process in more detail; then we can start pulling in information, stand up instances of the candidate stacks we’re looking at and trying them out.

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