Baying For Blood

I’ve mentioned this sort of thing before, but nevertheless: this is a really terrible piece of writing.

I remain convinced that the best way to stop a bully is not to go mewling to the teacher, who will only call the victim’s mummy, or to your own mummy, who will only call the teacher. The best way is to take the bully out for a short pounding after school – and may I make it plain, please, that I don’t mean the victims should do this, but rather others. The onus for stopping bullies lies not with the people being bullied, but with those who see it happen.

There’s much to find reprehensible here, not the least of which is the “I have lots of gay friends” non-defense. And it’s wholly unsurprising to find the National Post giving somebody a pulpit to tell us why beating up children is good for the children, and for society. But the thing that struck me about it was how the writing calls to mind this 1957 picture of one of the Little Rock Nine, Elizabeth Eckford. And more importantly of Hazel Bryan in the background, dripping with hate, screaming at the future.

It’s all that came to mind when I was reading Blatchford’s article; it’s crystal clear that the author has never given or received the abuse she advocates. She’d never deign to get any of the blood she’s calling for on her actual hands. She’s deniably, blameless part of the mob, shrieking for violence to be meted out by somebody else for no better reason than wanting to watch.

3 Comments

  1. Jamie
    Posted December 12, 2011 at 4:00 pm | Permalink

    As usual, the defense used in this case was that the piece was meant to be tongue-in-cheek. Not buying it. Either admit this is what you meant and stand by it (and be judged appropriately) or apologize profusely for producing such a crappy piece of writing (and have the NP publishers apologize for publishing such a crappy piece of writing).

  2. mhoye
    Posted December 12, 2011 at 5:02 pm | Permalink

    As usual, the defense used in this case was that the piece was meant to be tongue-in-cheek.

    Saying their listener “doesn’t have a sense of humor” is an absolutely typical, painfully predictable response from somebody getting called out for saying something indefensible.

  3. Bella AM
    Posted December 15, 2011 at 9:32 am | Permalink

    But it’s published in “ironic black” ink! :P