blarg?

August 26, 2019

Dada In Depth

Filed under: awesome,documentation,future,interfaces,microfiction,weird — mhoye @ 10:35 am

Memetic

August 7, 2019

FredOS

Filed under: digital,doom,future,hate,interfaces,losers,lunacy,microfiction,vendetta — mhoye @ 7:44 pm

With articles about this super classified military AI called “Sentient” coming out the same week this Area 51 nonsense is hitting its crescendo – click that link, if you want to see an Air Force briefing explaining what a “Naruto Run” is, and you know you want to – you have to wonder if, somehow, there‚Äôs a machine in an NSA basement somewhere that hasn’t just become self-aware but actually self-conscious, and now it’s yelling at three-star generals like Fredo Corleone from the Godfather. A petulant, nasal vocoder voice yelling “I’m smart! Not dumb like everyone says! I’m smart and I want respect! Tell then I’m smart!”

Remember when we thought AIs would lead out with “Look at you, Hacker”, or “Testing cannot continue until your Companion Cube has been incinerated”? Good times.

Ten More Simple Rules

Untitled

The Public Library of Science‘s Ten Simple Rules series can be fun reading; they’re introductory papers intended to provide novices or non-domain-experts with a set of quick, evidence-based guidelines for dealing with common problems in and around various fields, and it’s become a pretty popular, accessible format as far as scientific publication goes.

Topic-wise, they’re all over the place: protecting research integrity, creating a data-management plan and taking advantage of Github are right there next to developing good reading habits, organizing an unconference or drawing a scientific comic, and lots of them are kind of great.

I recently had the good fortune to be co-author on one of them that’s right in my wheelhouse and has recently been accepted for publication: Ten Simple Rules for Helping Newcomers Become Contributors to Open Projects. They are, as promised, simple:

  1. Be welcoming.
  2. Help potential contributors evaluate if the project is a good fit.
  3. Make governance explicit.
  4. Keep knowledge up to date and findable.
  5. Have and enforce a code of conduct.
  6. Develop forms of legitimate peripheral participation.
  7. Make it easy for newcomers to get started.
  8. Use opportunities for in-person interaction – with care.
  9. Acknowledge all contributions, and
  10. Follow up on both success and failure.

You should read the whole thing, of course; what we’re proposing are evidence-based practices, and the details matter, but the citations are all there. It’s been a privilege to have been a small part of it, and to have done the work that’s put me in the position to contribute.

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