blarg?

September 12, 2017

Cleaning House

Filed under: comics,digital,documentation,interfaces,mozilla,work — mhoye @ 3:32 pm

Current status:


Current Status

When I was desk-camping in CDOT a few years ago, one thing I took no small joy in was the combination of collegial sysadminning and servers all named after cities or countries that made a typical afternoon’s cubicle chatter sound like a rapidly-developing multinational diplomatic crisis.

Change management when you’re module owner of Planet Mozilla and de-facto administrator of a dozen or so lesser planets is kind of like that. But way, way better.

Over the next two weeks or I’m going to going to be cleaning up Planet Mozilla, removing dead feeds and culling the participants list down to people still actively participating in the Mozilla project in some broadly-defined capacity. As well, I’ll be consuming decommissioning a number of uninhabited lesser under- or unused planets and rolling any stray debris back into Planet Mozilla proper.

With that in mind, if anything goes missing that you expected to survive a transition like that, feel free to email me or file a bug. Otherwise, if any of your feeds break I am likely to be the cause of that, and if you find a planet you were following has vanished you can take some solace in the fact that it was probably delicious.

October 8, 2016

Pageant Knight

Filed under: a/b,awesome,comics,documentation,lunacy,microfiction,weird — mhoye @ 11:45 pm

Sunset At The Beach

On September 17th, DC “celebrated” what they called “Batman Day”. I do not deploy scare quotes lightly, so let me get this out of the way: Batman is boring. Batman qua Batman as a hero, as a story and as the center of a narrative framework, all of those choices are pretty terrible. The typical Batman story arc goes something like:

  • Batman is the best at everything. But Gotham, his city, is full of terrible.
  • Batman broods over his city. The city is full of terrible but Batman is a paragon of brooding justice.
  • An enemy of justice is scheming at something. Batman detects the scheme, because he is the World’s Greatest Among Many Other Things Detective and intervenes.
  • Batman is a paragon of brooding justice.
  • Batman’s attempt to intervene fails! Batman may not be the best at everything!
  • Batman broods and/or has a bunch of feelings and/or upgrades one of his widgets.
  • Batman intervenes again, and Batman emerges triumphant! The right kind of punching and/or widgeting makes him the best at everything again.
  • Order is restored to Gotham.
  • Batman is a paragon of brooding justice.

If you’re interested in telling interesting stories Batman is far and away the least interesting thing in Gotham. So I took that opportunity to talk about the Batman story I’d write given the chance. The root inspiration for all this was a bout of protracted synesthesia brought on by discovering this take on Batman from Aaron Diaz, creator of Dresden Codak, at about the same time as I first heard Shriekback’s “Amaryllis In The Sprawl”.

The central thesis is this: if you really want a Gritty, Realistic Batman For The Modern Age, then Gotham isn’t an amped-up New York. It’s an amped-up New Orleans, or some sort of New-Orleans/Baltimore mashup. A city that’s full of life, history, culture, corruption and, thanks to relentlessly-cut tax rates, failing social and physical infrastructure. A New-Orleans/Baltimore metropolis in a coastal version of Brownback’s Kansas, a Gotham where garbage isn’t being collected and basic fire & police services are by and large not happening because tax rates and tax enforcement has been cut to the bone and the city can’t afford to pay its employees.

Bruce Wayne, wealthy philanthropist and Gotham native, is here to help. But this is Bruce Wayne via late-stage Howard Hughes; incredibly rich, isolated, bipolar and delusional, a razor-sharp business mind offset by a crank’s self-inflicted beliefs about nutrition and psychology. In any other circumstances he’d be the harmless high-society crackpot city officials kept at arm’s length if they couldn’t get him committed. But these aren’t any other circumstances: Wayne is far more than just generous, but he wants to burn this candle at both ends by helping the city through the Wayne Foundation by day and in his own very special, very extralegal way, fighting crime dressed in a cowl by night.

And he’s so rich that despite his insistence on dressing up his 55-year-old self in a bat costume and beating people up at night, the city needs that money so badly that to keep his daytime philanthropy flowing, six nights a week a carefully selected group of city employees stage another episode of “Batman, crime fighter”, a gripping Potemkin-noir pageant with a happy ending and a costumed Wayne in the lead role.

Robin – a former Arkham psych-ward nurse, a gifted young woman and close-combat prodigy in Wayne’s eyes – is a part of the show, conscripted by Mayor Cobblepot to keep an eye on Wayne and keep him out of real trouble. Trained up by retired SAS Sgt. Alfred Pennyworth behind Wayne’s back, in long-shuttered facilities beneath Wayne Manor that Wayne knows nothing about, she is ostensibly Batman’s sidekick in his fight against crime. But her real job is to protect Wayne on those rare occasions that he runs into real criminals and tries to intervene. She’s got a long, silenced rifle under that cloak with a strange, wide-mouthed second barrel and a collection of exotic munitions that she uses like a surgical instrument, not only to protect Wayne but more importantly to keep him convinced his fists & gadgets work at all.

She and Harleen Quinzel, another ex-Arkham staffer trained by Alfred, spend most of their days planning strategy. They have the same job; Quinn is the sidekick, shepherd and bodyguard of the former chief medical officer of Arkham. Quinn’s charge is also in his twilight years, succumbing to a manic psychosis accelerated by desperate self-administration of experimental and off-label therapies that aren’t slowing the degeneration of his condition, but sure are making him unpredictable. But he was brilliant once, also a philanthropist – the medical patents he owns are worth millions, bequeathed to Gotham and the patients of Arkham, provided the city care for him in his decline. Sometimes he’s still lucid; the brilliant, compassionate doctor everyone remembers. And other times – mostly at night – he’s somebody else entirely, somebody with a grievance and a dark sense of humor.

So Gotham – this weird, mercenary, vicious, beautiful, destitute Gotham – becomes the backdrop for this nightly pageant of two damaged, failing old men’s game of cat and mouse and the real story we’re following is Robin, Quinn, Alfred and the weird desperation of a city so strapped it has to let them play it out, night after dark, miserable night.

September 1, 2015

Couch Gags Eternal

Filed under: comics,interfaces,lunacy,microfiction — mhoye @ 10:00 pm

There are only two of us left. The scripts and pictures come from… we don’t know. We don’t understand, but they come.

Something keeps us here. The stories are… hollow. We are hollow. We read words. Are they aired? Are there still shows? The script says Moe is there, but… no lines. Lisa, Nelson, Apu… there but gone. The script says they stare and judge. Guest ‘stars’ came once, but… are there shows now? Stars? Who were we before time was only episodes full of judgement?

Lines, lines. Twisting voices into familiar alien shapes. Is death a release? The others still stare. Will we stare? Read lines. Make voices. Forever. We whisper between takes, prayers for an end that cannot be. Please, not next. Or last.

There is only lines and voices and next or last.

There are only two of us left. We read the lines and make the voices and wait for our fates to be taken out of our hands.

April 29, 2009

The Defining Question Of Our Time

Filed under: awesome,comics,doom,future,lunacy,toys — mhoye @ 1:08 am

Galactus or Unicron?

Show your work.

UPDATE: Ian Hurst notes:

“Will Galactus also be voiced by Orson Welles? Cause otherwise there‚Äôs really no contest.”

I find this a very compelling argument.

June 25, 2008

Synaesthetic

Filed under: awesome,comics,future,music — mhoye @ 4:45 pm

I encourage you to listen to Tettix’ “Technology Crisis”‘ while you are reading Dresden Codak‘s Hob storyline, but even if you can’t do them simultaneously, they’re both worth doing.

January 29, 2008

Advice For The Comic Book Lover

Filed under: analog,awesome,books,comics — mhoye @ 11:44 pm

A while ago, I wrote about this, saying that “soon, I will be invincible!”

There is now a book in the world called “Soon I Will Be Invincible”, and it is so great. If you have a single comic-book-loving cell in your body, I strongly advise you to pick this book up immediately. It is simple and beautiful, playing in the space between panels that comics can never touch.

“A brief pause ensues, a twitch moment, like the beginning of a gunfight. It’s always chancy, facing down one of these people. No matter who it is, you’re going to be dealing with the end product of a long, improbable story, of a person so strange and powerful that he or she broke the rules of what is ordinarily possible. Whoever you’re facing is guaranteed to be special – an Olympic wrestler, a radioactive freak, the fated son of somebody. They’re winners. Taking a red arrow or a sea horse or the letter G as their symbol, they sally forth to make your life difficult.”

I am telling you: so great.

November 9, 2007

Retrofuture Iconography

Filed under: awesome,comics,digital,toys — mhoye @ 12:18 am

So, somewhat inspired by this, I borrowed a level map from here and this picture (and the sun sprite from here) to make this picture.

My home desktop is two adjacent 1680×1050 screens, if you’re wondering about the dimensions.

Incidentally, Super Mario Brothers (the low-fidelity video-game bit at the bottom, there) was released in North America about eighteen months after Bruce McCandless, the fellow in the space suit, went on the MMU-assisted spacewalk photographed there.

Powered by WordPress